Mixing Queen

A Californian DJ and experienced bartender Kristin Vincent elaborates on the importance of authentic taste, explains how to run three bars and a baby, and recalls sailing with a prince of Serbia to a floating hotel party in Venice

I prefer Earl Grey in the mornings.

I’ve always looked for this mix of Lower East-Side but with that low-key, Brooklyn vibe.

You need to pick one thing and be one-hundred percent about it.

I tested out New York for a year to see if I like it, and I did. So I just stayed.

My clothes are black, grey, or white.

All things Paris.

It’s not that I wanted my tattoos to be hearts and stars; it’s that I didn’t want anything else.

Yes, my baby has a motorcycle jacket too.

Actually I’m a DJ.

Once I swore, I would never open a place that sells food.

I grew up in the suburbs of Los Angeles. Few things in the world are more reliably boring than the suburbs of Los Angeles.

I studied philosophy.

Sometimes, it takes time to realize why I like certain things.

I was trying hard to come up with a good name for this oyster bar, and it doesn’t work when you’re trying too hard.

My husband is a painter.

Tequila is very inspiring.

Basically the whole block here in Bowery comes to eat in one of my places.

I love this old cash register. Not sure how it works, but it’s quite gorgeous, isn’t it?

All doors here are brass doors from some old hotels around New York.

I was always good at picking out things ahead of their time.

When decorating a place, I spend a lot of money on a few things, and then hand do everything else.

A lot of bars are too masculine.

It would be too easy to open a bar with some subway tiles and rusted metal.

I wish I were having brunch right now.

I like going to Isabel Marant, or Chanel to buy some things. After a couple of glasses of Champagne, of course.

Have you guys seen “Sons of Anarchy”?

Recently I’ve been in Italy, France, Canada, UK, Germany and Mexico, but I don’t feel like I’m a well-traveled person.

Once a prince of Serbia invited me to dinner. I could get used to this.

My husband doesn’t let me have any say in his work.

My one-year-old understands Italian better than I do.

Once I bought my daughter a $300 sweater, and my husband almost lost his mind.

I’m always like, “What next? What next? What do I do next?”

I do want more, but not sure what that means.

I can’t knock people for wanting to make their money, but it seems like they tear apart a lot of things trying to do it.

I wish I could invent things.

Sel Rrose, Cocktails & Oysters
1 Delancey St, New York
selrrose.com